The Department of Psychology is delighted to announce the next talk of the Mind Meeting Seminar Series.

On Thursday 14th November, Prof. Jan Born (University of Tübingen) will give a talk entitled “About the memory function of sleep”.

When: Thursday 14th November, 15.30. The talk will be followed by a drinks reception.

Where: Wilhelm Wundt Room (note: change of location!), MPI for Cognitive and Brain Sciences Leipzig

You are very welcome to attend!

 

Abstract:

Whereas memories are optimally encoded and retrieved when the brain is awake, the consolidation and formation of long-term memory requires an offline mode of processing as optimally established only during sleep. Based on evidence from behavioral and neurophysiological studies in humans and rodents, I will consider the formation of long-term memory during sleep as an “active systems consolidation” process in which  the repeated neuronal replay of representations originating from the hippocampus during slow-wave sleep (SWS) leads to a gradual transformation and integration of representations in neocortical networks. I will highlight three features of this process: (i) Hippocampal replay that, by capturing episodic memory aspects, drives consolidation of both hippocampus-dependent and non-hippocampus-dependent memory; (ii) brain oscillations hallmarking SWS and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep that provide mechanisms to regulate both information flow across distant brain networks and local synaptic plasticity; and (iii) qualitative transformations of memories during systems consolidation resulting in abstracted, gist-like representations.

 

Recent publications:

  • M Friedrich, M Mölle, AD Friederici, J Born (2019). The reciprocal relation between sleep and memory in infancy: Memory‐dependent adjustment of sleep spindles and spindle‐dependent improvement of memories. Developmental science 22 (2), e12743
  • N Niethard, HVV Ngo, I Ehrlich, J Born (2018). Cortical circuit activity underlying sleep slow oscillations and spindles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115 (39), E9220-E9229
  • A Sawangjit, CN Oyanedel, N Niethard, C Salazar, J Born, M Inostroza (2019). The hippocampus is crucial for forming non-hippocampal long-term memory during sleep. Nature 564 (7734), 109

 

Upcoming Mind Meeting talks:

12 December 2019 | György Buzsaki, New York University
16 January 2020 | Monika Schönauer, Princeton University
13 February 2020 | Bradley C. Love, University College London